Winter At The Allotment

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It looks pretty dreary on the plots, and these days the only person I see at the allotment is an elderly man who likes to walk his dog around the perimeter path. But there’s still stuff to harvest – parsnips, carrots, leeks, kale, perpetual spinach, Swiss chard, purple sprouting, and in the polytunnel lettuce and various Chinese mustards. There are also 8 compost heaps to turn or add to, and now is the season for collecting leaves to make leaf mould. I’ve filled three new bins with leaves from the wood, and last autumn’s caches are beginning to rot down nicely; I’m hoping they’ll be ready for spring sowing. So despite these gloomy looks – all is filled with new possibilities.

31 thoughts on “Winter At The Allotment

  1. My beans are just beginning to make headway, and one or two squash have hints of flowers about them.
    The spinach is also sprouting, so too several kinds of toms. As some of yours’ goes into partial slumber ours will be ready to pick and eat.
    Such is the cycle of life!

  2. You are a very industrious person Tish. I’m continually astonished at what is still growing during the winter months. I harvested some winter leaves and baby spinach the other day for a salad and they were delicious, all the more from being freshly picked. I have kale too, but only a couple of plants germinated this year.

      1. Quite. These winter leaves have done much better than the summer varieties which first got eaten by the S&S, those that survived that attack then bolted in the heat! I didn’t pick anything!

    1. That’s good to hear, Klausbernd 🙂 Mine too. But best of all were my Spanish Shelling Beans – big white beans – delicious cooked as the Greeks cook them in lots of olive oil, garlic and oregano.

  3. Oh my, congratulations on the 8!!! Compost bins to turn, you must have biceps like a weight lifter. I sweat with one. But the garden will love you for your dedication to recycling

    1. I’ve made things easier by having bigger bins which I only partly fill, so I then just shift the stuff from side to side, usually by hand rather than with a fork, so it’s much less sweat-making 🙂

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