Giraffe

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When we lived in Nairobi the Giraffe Centre on the edge of the city’s national park was a favourite place to visit. It was set up in 1979 both as an educational resource for city school children (50,000 visits a year) and as a conservation project to protect Kenya’s endangered race of Rothschild giraffes. The centre runs a breeding programme and over the years some 40 young giraffes have been settled in safe game reserves across the country. Now in 2020 the initiative can proudly claim to have helped restore Kenya’s wild population from 130 to a little over 700, and that has to be good news.

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As you can see, the centre provides for head to head contact. The resident giraffes are much addicted to the ‘giraffe nuts’ which visitors hand out to them, though I have to say, from the donor perspective,  a slurp from a long giraffe tongue is not the best of experiences.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: horns

Can’t See The Wood For The Trees?

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These photos were taken on an October morning not so long ago – on the path to Croft Ambrey Hillfort from Croft Castle in our neighbouring county of Herefordshire.

The old saying of not seeing the wood for the trees has deep resonance now. We need to start seeing. The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine in Oxford is a good spot for some illumination; lots of informed common sense on matters covid from Professor Carl Heneghan who is also a practising doctor.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: wood

Bringing Up The Rear ~ That Would Be Me

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Walled Garden, Attingham Park

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He who lives my house has a habit of walking into my shots so I have quite a file of Graham-from-behind photos. I rather like this one though, mainly because the truncated wintery view of the walled garden probably wouldn’t have added up to much if he hadn’t stopped for a moment’s contemplation.

Here are some more ‘back’ views come upon during Farrell expeditions around Much Wenlock:

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The path from Wenlock Edge behind the house

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Field path to Bradley Farm

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The lane behind Wenlock Priory

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The Linden Walk with passing speed-walker

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On Wenlock Edge looking towards Ironbridge Power Station

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A ‘now what’s she doing look’ on the old railway line

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Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: the back of things

Square Perspective #24

Thought For The Day: Even An Ant May Cast A Shadow

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Friday evening at the allotment: the ant and the artichoke.

Please visit Thom at Writing Prompts and Practice for the true story behind this photo: 

‘Be strong, be brave, and cast a big shadow.’

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Close-ups

Hurrah For The Talyllyn Railway Men!

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A couple of summers ago we had a perfectly batty day out on the Talyllyn Railway, the world’s oldest preserved steam railway. The line runs from the mid-Wales seaside town of Tywyn up into the hills to the old Nant Gwernol slate quarry – the shifting of slate being the original reason for the line’s existence. You can see the full colour account of that trip at: Partners in steam on the Talyllyn Railway – Woo-Hooooo. But as Cee’s Black White Challenge this week in all about ‘heads’ and ‘features’, I thought I’d celebrate the Talyllyn’s enthusiastic and dedicated volunteers with a little photo gallery of those we met that day. A pleasure to travel with you, good sirs.

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Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: heads or facial features

In And Out And Round About Much Wenlock

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Below Wenlock Edge on the way to Westhope.

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The Downs Mill lane two winters ago.

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Much Wenlock High Street, Reynold’s Mansion built in the 16th and 17th centuries  on the immediate left.

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The lane by Wenlock Priory ruins and some fine Corsican pines.

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On home territory – a shining on Sheinton Street.

Cee’s B & W Photo Challenge: roads

The Beach Bicyclist

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It’s years since I rode a bike. In fact I wonder if I still can, though I do remember the precise moment when I first mastered the skill and forward momentum suddenly happened. Just like that – after hours of wobbles and falling about. What a sense of freedom. And so I’m thinking if I had a handy beach I might well give it another go. Softish surface to land on for one thing. But what joy to whizz over tide-washed shores, sea wind in one’s face, gulls wheeling in their own particular way.

Looking at this photo now I’m beginning to feel envious of this unknown cyclist caught plying Newborough sands a few Christmases ago.

 

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: cycles – one, two, or three wheelers