5 Minutes With An Artichoke And A Red-Tailed Bumblebee ~ Regular Random

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Frequently Flying Scientist, Desley Jane, is a very talented photographer. Macro mode is a particular speciality, and especially when it comes to making delicious little cakes impossibly tempting. This week she has quite a different subject for her ‘Regular Random’ slot. So please visit her and join in the challenge. These are the rules:

  • choose a subject or a scene
  • spend five minutes photographing it – no more!
  • try to see it from many angles, look through something at it, change the light that’s hitting it
  • have fun!
  • tag your post #regularrandom and ping back to this post

My five minutes was devoted to some allotment artichokes. The sun was full on, the artichoke flower rather too tall, and the wind kept gusting, so the outcome is definitely random. Nice performance by the pollen dusted bumblebee though.

47 thoughts on “5 Minutes With An Artichoke And A Red-Tailed Bumblebee ~ Regular Random

  1. Wow, you’re doing pretty good in your allotment. I tried artichokes in the yard out back. I only got a few and we are them before the flower. Wonderful shots.

    1. Eating them is best, though the flowers are beautiful, and I have left one or two. This year I’ve learned to cut the plants down the ground once they’ve fruited. That way we might get a second crop.

  2. I fell in love with artichoke blooms last year when I happened to pass by a monastery garden in Germany. I had never seen their gorgeous magenta blooms, big as a dinner plate. So I decided to grow some myself this year. I managed to get 2 plants from 6 seeds and their spiny leaves are growing. I understand that they are biennial, so keeping my fingers crossed that they’ll make it through the winter. Great photos, Tish.

    1. Hello Annette. Your seedlings may well be perennials. They can be a little tender in their first year, and if outside need straw or fleece round them for the winter. Here’s some info from Sarah Raven’s plant site: https://www.sarahraven.com/veg_fruit/seeds/veg_seeds/artichoke_violet_de_provence.htm
      If you are growing them to eat, then after a year or so you need to slice off some of the side shoots and start new plants. You can keep the older plants for flowers alone and have the best of both worlds 🙂

  3. First, great shots of the choke, the ants, the bee and really good macros. I’m going to save this post because five minutes is often exactly how long it take me to close in on a subject. Okay, sometimes less, but also, occasionally more. Thanks!!

  4. That sounds like a fun challenge, Tish. Hmm, when I consider how much time goes into one photo, I’m impressed with this outcome. 🙂 Well done.
    We have some artichokes in the garden too, but they are only a delight for the eye, not for eating as they always get lice.

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