Garden Gold ~ Calendula Officinalis

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In medieval times the flowers of the common pot marigold (Calendula officinalis) were included in ‘a cure’ for bubonic plague – added to the finely ground shells of new laid eggs and stirred in with treacle and warm beer; to be drunk night and morning. I’m not sure about the powdered egg shell, but the rest of it sounds quite heart-warming. And that’s the best thing about marigolds: simple to catch sight of them lifts the spirits, and lifted spirits are an essential part of wellness and wellbeing. So here is some Friday morning ‘medicine’ from the allotment, marigolds self-sown and grown without one finger’s worth of help from me – a free and lovely gift from Planet Botanic.

Copyright 2019 Tish Farrell

43 thoughts on “Garden Gold ~ Calendula Officinalis

    1. I forgot to say in the post, but they are still much used by medical herbalists – for their anti viral/fungal and anti-inflammatory properties and especially for skin problems.

  1. Lovely photo, with the water droplets and dark background.
    As you say, Tish…’lifted spirits are an essential part of wellness and wellbeing.’ …I had mine lifted on Wednesday with a trip into London with a friend, and plenty of photo ops at Borough Market

    1. Markets are great places for a good cheering up, aren’t they. So much positive energy and lovely smells and sights of well made loaves, shiny veg. Oh yes and those artisan cheeses!

    1. Now that I have never seen happen, and my allotment has all the pests under the sun. Some early (unseasonal) pupating something or other? The marigolds should keep coming though, if they have been self-seeding.

  2. Beautiful shot, but I think I’ll pass on the recipe. 🙂 I did make some gluten-free, low-carb crackers to take as a gift tonight when we have dinner with friends, several of whom are avoiding carbs. That recipe is rather tasty even though lacking exotic ingredients. 🙂

    Happy weekend, Tish.

    janet

      1. 2 oz each of chia and flax seeds, 2 oz sesame and poppy seed, 4 oz each of pumpkin and sunflower seed. sprinkle of salt. I also add a sprinkle of cumin seed. Stir in 8 fluid oz about half pint of water, and leave for 15 mins to absorb. Then flatten out on to a bakingsheet with parchment. I make mine as thin as poss – 2-3mm. Bake in oven 170 degrees C. After about 15 mins take out tray and cut into squares then put back in oven for at least another 20 mins. Possibly longer to really crisp up. I also leave mine in the oven after I’ve turned it off. They need to be stored in something very airtight or they go a bit bendy. Great with Black bomber cheddar or runny Brie. I got this recipe originally from Su in NZ.

  3. I have some Indian Prince marigolds appear in my raised bed which I sowed last year, but only one appeared. They seem very happy this year! Such cheerful flowers and I love your raindrops 🙂

    1. Indian prince marigolds are so very handsome. Definitely worth encouraging. The raindrops are v. nice in the photo, but have to say they made me very wet at lunchtime! The downpours the weather people called ‘light showers’.

      1. Yummmm! 😀 … and easy to adapt if you wanted something sweet, a bit of dried fruit, dates, a very light drizzle of maple syrup, perhaps. 🙂

  4. Beautiful shot Tish. Just what I need on a grey foggy morning. I’m glad you’re still enjoying the crackers. I made my first batch in a while yesterday, and am relishing how very good they are.

  5. They are beautiful flowers, Tish, such gorgeous, golden shades. The old remedies are fascinating, I’m not sure I’d fancy the ground egg shells, either..but I’d give the other ingredients a try…just as long as I don’t have bubonic plague!

  6. I wonder if some of our ‘cures’ (not cures) will seem as curious to future generations as the marigold mixture seems to me today. I can report that I do feel somewhat better (currently have a nasty cold) while looking at your lovely marigold picture.

  7. Hm-m … I don’t think my ‘yummm’ comment turned up where it was supposed to – with your crackers recipe. Oh well, that’s life in the comments lane! 😀

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