The Changing Seasons March 2018 ~ All Wind, Snow And White Horses

This was the sight that greeted us as we drove back into Shropshire from Wales last Saturday – a snow-dusted vision of Titterstone Clee. A windscreen shot too. Here and there along the country roads there was also some astonishing ice art in the hedges. Temperatures were so frigid that when cars drove through verge puddles  the water splashed up on to the bare twigs and froze in cascades of tiny silver icicles. I’ve never seen anything quite like it, and certainly not in March: Christmas trees all over again. Anyway, March may be summed up in one word: FREEZING.

 

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In which Six Go Potty In Pembroke With Cockapoo Puppy  – holiday snaps #3

 

The Changing Seasons: March 2018

55 thoughts on “The Changing Seasons March 2018 ~ All Wind, Snow And White Horses

  1. Your photos are fabulous Tish; I so love the blue tint, especially in that shot of the fence, gate and clouds. I could feel the cold catching in my throat. 🙂

  2. We were chatting over breakfast this morning about whether we could live in England … it still offers a degree of individual freedom one struggles to find out here. (Maybe this is imagined?) Although there are undoubtedly places in the UK where one would be nuts to simple ”go for a wander.”
    I said I would probably struggle to adapt again, largely because of the weather.
    And your pictures, albeit beautiful, and the description of the frigid conditions confirm my suspicions.

    My dad sometimes calls me ”Sunny Jim” in a humorous sense when he wants to reprimand me over something, and the description is close to being more literal than he knows!

    Brrrrrr!

    Here comes the sun … little darling, it’s all right… (George Harrison)

    🙂

      1. Well, at the mo it is throwing it down – has been since around 10 last night – and quite chilly.
        The pond/pool is overflowing and everything is very soggy!

      2. That’s not what one expects in your domain. It’s been tipping it down in Kenya too – homes washed away in areas that have been short of rain for years.

      3. Drought or Flood. It’s 17:15 and still throwing it down. I suspect it will rain throughout the night once more and maybe clear up a bit by tomorrow.

    1. I think you soon acclimatise to the weather here, and the fact that you can walk home at night without fear is something that I appreciate. Living behind electric fences, having guards, keeping a gun in the glove compartment in the car. Thinking that is the norm. Those are things I am not sad to have left behind.

      1. I was quite shocked on returning to Jo’burg in 2001 to feel more afraid than I had in the bush with scorpions and snakes and the possibility of charging elephants or hippos.

  3. she is out there. Spring I mean. We are back down into the 30’s again but soon,very soon hopefully things will settle down temp wise but then we will have more Spring storms.Poor farmers have a challenge.

  4. Gorgeous gallery Tish – of shape and colour of winter. Do you have a new camera/lens – such professional shots!
    P.S. Spring taking a page out of winter’s book at least til mid -April I hear!

    1. You do say such nice things, Laura. I actually use 3 point and shoots – lumix, canon ixus and aged steam powered little canon that is brilliant because it has a view finder, albeit with life forms living in it. I swap from one to the other, which is a tad confusing re settings.

  5. These are beautiful Tish – they actually LOOK cold!! We’ve been lucky this month and are looking forward to warm sunshine from now on. Our friends in the northeast are not so lucky!

  6. Seeing Titterstone Clee was always a sign that we were almost home. How lovely to see it again in a dusting of snow. Lovely, albeit cold looking photos Tish.

    1. It’s something of an optical illusion, and must be to do with the snow. It’s really only a hill, and to be truthful, though we’ve driven along this road many times heading towards Ludlow out of Wales, I’ve never particularly noticed it before. Titterstone Clee is the name. There is also Brown Clee. We rather take them for granted. Just part of the Shropshire landscape!

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