On Windmill Hill

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The old windmill is a much loved landmark, seen from many quarters as you approach Much Wenlock. To reach it you can take the Linden Walk which brings you to the wooded flanks of Shadwell hill. Or you can walk across the Linden Field to the far corner where there is an old iron gate that opens onto the well worn trail up to the windmill. It’s a steepish climb mind you, but at this time of year there’s plenty of reasons to stop and gaze: every few steps a fresh wildflower panorama to take in, the scents of summer grasses and of lady’s bedstraw.

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Along the path where the footfalls of Wenlock’s denizens have worn the topsoil to bare rock – wild thyme – a mass of tiny purple flowers, spills over the exposed limestone. There is also pale pink musk mallow, seemingly clinging to the most meagre soil cover. Then by contrast, on either side the path is an exuberant  floriferousness, typical of an unspoiled limestone meadow: a host of flowering grasses whose names, I’m sorry to say, I do not know, purple pyramidal orchids, pale yellow spires of agrimony, golden stars of St. John’s Wort, pink soapwort and pea flower, purple knapweed, yellow vetch and buttercups, pink and white striped bindweed, viper’s bugloss, musk thistles and clovers. One could spend all day up here and not see everything.

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Tree Square #4 This month Becky wants to see trees (header shot) in square format.

27 thoughts on “On Windmill Hill

    1. It’s really stunning for orchids this year. Also discovered a new flower (to me that is) up there today. It has the unfortunate name of dropwort but is related to meadow sweet.

      1. It is a lovely flower the dropwort, I know I have seen it before but had no idea of its name.

        ooh i wonder if that’s why a neighbour suddenly has orchids appearing in her lawn?

  1. I read somewhere there’s an app one can get specifically for identifying (wild) flowers?
    Might be what you’re after to update your botany directory?

    Lovely photos, as usual.
    Nothing like green in England.

    1. I tend to rely on good old Keble Martin (as in hard copy) who lives under my desk. I admit I have been too lazy to apply myself to his grasses pages though.

  2. Wildflowers are so beautiful. A reminder that I should go to the Lizard peninsula before the hordes arrive. Do you get the meadow geranium too?

    1. No, we don’t get the meadow geranium. It would be lovely if we did. We have a couple of minutely flowered varieties, one a v. pale pink and one purple – maybe the ‘Small flowered’ and ‘Cut-leaved’ cranesbills respectively. I must pay more attention.

    1. That’s a great pity. Being a small rural community we have been lucky to have places to walk throughout the lockdowns. Hoping things improve for you soon.

  3. I do so love nature, Tish, and your photos are inspiring. The plethora of wildflowers are wonderful, the windmill a proud sentinel above them. Fabulous!

      1. I know what you mean, Tish. Nature is the panacea for all that ails. I find it uplifting for body, mind and spirit. I haven’t been able to get out much with all the rain so I’ve spent a few hours today looking at all the nature articles on WordPress. Refreshing!

      2. And what rain! I imagine you’ve been getting the worst of it on your side of the mountains. Shropshire is supposed to be a rain shadow region, though I think my geography teacher was possibly confused.

      3. It’s been torrential, and not over yet. Where is summer? I ask myself.

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