Still Lifes At The November Allotment

It has to be said the November allotment is a pretty dreary place.  The ground is sodden and too many of the plots have run amok. But here and there, if I focus on the particular rather than the whole, a few happenstance artworks catch my eye.

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Russet Apples

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Simon’s Globe Artichokes gone to seed.

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Jenny’s watering can where it has been hanging for the last several years. ***

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Self-grown Snapdragon in my old runner bean plot. On its second flowering.

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Duckweed and leaves on the allotment pond

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Fallen apples on an abandoned plot

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Quince leaves in the communal orchard

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Rugosa Rosehips.

Six Word Saturday

 

*** Thom who is a marvel at flash fiction on just about any topic and in any setting and with a seemingly endless array of compelling characters  was ‘spoken to’ by the watering can. Pop over to his place to see what he’s written: https://tnkerr.wordpress.com/2019/11/17/a-bit-o-friction-tween-old-jenny-and-mulvaney/

I just love it when one thing leads to another. Cheers Thom!

57 thoughts on “Still Lifes At The November Allotment

  1. Beautiful still lives, Tish, especially the watering cans and the rosehips. I’d include the artichoke shot (I really do include it), but I mourn the uneaten artichokes! 🙂 I’ve never seen them in real life and gone to seed. But if every thistle were an artichoke, oh, how delightful life would be!!

    janet

    1. Oh how I second that notion, Janet – every thistle an artichoke. And agree too, what a loss not to eat the ones that we do have. I’ve noticed that the different varieties growing at the allotment seem utterly confused climate-wise. Some start producing in the winter and then get frosted, and then they don’t do much in the summer when you expect them to. It’s quite a challenge to catch a good one.

    1. Thank you, Meg. It’s a bit of a challenge to find bright spots amongst all the sogginess. We’ve been promised less rain next week – just in time to cut down all the rain-drearied vegetation in the garden.

      1. You are such a whizz, Thom. I love that you can be so inspired by a watering can. It’s lesson to all of us: – keep the story-seeking-radar switched on at ALL times, because you just never know where the next tale will pop up.

  2. The allotment always seems to have something lovely to offer. My favourites are the snapdragons and the gorgeous fallen apples. My snapdragons are just starting to bloom. They will probably be around until well into autumn next year.

  3. Not bad for mid-November eh? Nice dollops of color amid the drear, as it were…thanks for sharing and brightening my day some, old friend! Bill

  4. You seem to still have a variety of apples, as we had in the orchard at the Normandy house. There were dozens of apple species then, small, red, green, acid, sweet. For cider or for jam. Way beyond the boring “golden apple”.
    (Isn’t the whole just the sum of particulars?) 😉

    1. Hi Ian. Just been over to your blog. That’s an impressive amount of digging you’ve done. Before you do any more you might want to check out https://charlesdowding.co.uk/ and his no-dig gardening. Your grassy plot looks ideal for the cardboard and compost approach. It might be interesting to compare both methods – conventional versus no-dig.

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