Sun And Rain In The Seychelles

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We were living in Zambia at the time – in Lusaka, a city that in 1993 was  beset by cholera from infected boreholes, rumours of military coups, incursions over the border by predatory gangs of Zairean military making up for lack of pay, and the populace being structurally readjusted courtesy of financial rigours visited on them by the International Monetary Fund. Elsewhere in the country, people were starving due to severe drought and high maize prices; there was an outbreak of swine fever that caused small farmer chaos, and reported figures for HIV infection were sky high.

It was thus a relief to leave for two weeks of quietness on Mahé, the Seychelles main island. The place was blissful, but there were twinges of guilt nonetheless as we wandered barefoot on near empty beaches: we had the means to take a break from Zambia when most of Zambia’s ten million citizens did not.

For more of the Zambia story: Letters from Lusaka part 1 and part 2,

Once in Zambia: in memoriam

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Ailsa’s Travel Theme: Rain

Six Word Saturday

22 thoughts on “Sun And Rain In The Seychelles

  1. You are right, Tish….
    Not always we realize that beyond our state of life , there are so many who are starving and facing war , with no chances at all…
    Your photo is really awesome , thanks for the share !

  2. Beautiful photo. We are so blessed, aren’t we, yet so often forget, complaining about such small things while others are struggling for food, work, even life. Gratitude is a habit worth cultivating daily! Thanks for today’s reminder.

    janet

  3. Wow….and to think that we complain if the electricity goes out for a hour!! This beautiful image really could be a watercolour painting. Thank you and hope you are enjoying the good weather in your garden…janet 🙂

  4. Once upon a time in Ghana things were that bad just as in Zambia. In the late 70s to the early 80s after the military takeovers that rocked our country. As if God wanted to punish us for the blood that we let flow by killing the heads of state and top military personals in the coup d’etats, the country went thru extreme famine and droughts. Thank God I survived that period. 🙂

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