Once In Kalamata

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A few Septembers ago we had a family trip to Kalamata on the Peloponnese. I had not been to  Greece before, and it was love at first sight – from the moment we left the airport. There had been a fierce summer that year with no rain and the earth looked parched. I don’t know what it was that spoke to me most – the rugged stony uplands, the everywhere-colonies of feathery phragmites reeds, the wild cyclamen, household clutter around the homesteads and olive groves, the olive groves themselves, the country lanes and then the views of the Taygetos Mountains across the Messinian Gulf. The only downside for us, though quite the opposite for the locals, we brought the rain on our heels, so there are stormy skies as well as china blue ones. It anyway seems like a dream now.

Past Squares #13

Life in Colour: Orange

17 thoughts on “Once In Kalamata

  1. I like the seemingly random list of things you loved most about the place, especially the household clutter you describe. Odd that would have a romantic quality but I see that, it’s a kind of authenticity about the place that’s very specific and true to itself. And something I can relate to from my travels too. Thanks for sharing Tish! Greetings to you and yours, this mid-October…😊

  2. Isn’t wonderful when you fall in love with a place straight from the airport?! It doesn’t always happen, as airports are rarely in the most beautiful places. But when it does it feels very special. I loved seeing your Kalamata images but I loved even more your descriptive prose of the things that spoke to you most about this place 🙂

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